PageFever.com tried to Scam me, so I’ll SEO the shit out of this post

As my comic has grown, especially the Things in Squares comics Facebook page, I’ve been happy to see increased interaction with followers. But more exposure comes with a downside, too. It comes with more spam comments on this website, as well as unsolicited “super unavoidably amazing opportunities”, and also just more web professionals and SEO specialists contacting me to offer their services. For the most part the latter aren’t scams. But if you’re a webcomic creator, know that you can learn SEO on your own.

SEO is “Search Engine Optimization”, and it’s what you do to a website and blog posts to get them to rank higher up on Google Search Engine Results Pages (SERPs). Pagefever.com tried to scam me. Normally I’d just ignore it, but in researching their reputation, I found no good long post about their sketchiness. So I’ve decided to write one. And I’ll optimize the shit out of it so that anyone trying to vet this company can find this post and learn that Pagefever.com is a scam.



What makes PageFever.com a scam?

I was contacted by a Wu Luong from Page Fever. I won’t link to them from here because I don’t want to give their domain further authority. (Linking to a website helps pages on that domain rank higher on Google and other search engines).

Page Fever scam

The offer was too good to be true, and we all know how the saying goes. If you’re unfamiliar with it, this article is a good read to understand Facebook scams. So what was the offer? Here’s a link to the full e-mail. Here’s a bit from the e-mail.

“Throughout our partnership, you can easily make $350 a week without having your Facebook Page affected in any way, and receive more traffic to your page with our complimentary services that we provide for becoming our partner. … Here’s how it works.  We use your Facebook ads manager to advertise our health and beauty products.  None of our ads will be pushed to your facebook page/account and these ads are not posted under your facebook page/name nor do we push our ads to your following base meaning you can use your facebook normally as you always did while at the same time being compensated for allowing us to utilize your facebook page.  Facebook allows leeway to people who own very strong pages, and since our advertisements are “aggressive”, we need your help.”

He later elaborates, saying that I would receive $200 as an initial payment, a $50 complimentary post boost budget, and $350 per week from then on. I was attracted to the amounts, who wouldn’t be? But the wording was wrong. Why would he say that I could easily make $350 a week, and then say that it’s guaranteed? And what can be more fishy than someone admitting they want to use you to post aggressive content?

What is Page Fever and how do you tell if they’re legitimate?

What is it that they do exactly? Page Fever markets themselves as “Friend to influencers across the globe.” And they claim to be the “Leader in monetizing social traffic.” The business model, as described on their site and in the e-mail they sent me, is simple.

Basically, they would use my Facebook page to publish ads elsewhere on Facebook. I don’t know for certain, but I imagine that the more followers and engagement a page has, the more exposure Facebook ad campaigns might have. One of the claims is that my following would grow thanks to the ads. But to get new followers based on Page Fever’s beauty product ads is not appeasing. It’s a ruse, in any case. These are words designed to look yummy–look at all these great things I get and I don’t have to do anything!

Wrong. I’d have to give them administrative access to my Facebook page. Why would I trust a strange company to do only what it says it would do, namely, create and manage ads? Later, they even say this:

Once you make us “editor & advertiser” we will also have you add one of our credit cards to your account so that all expenses are taken care of at our end.

On the surface, it’s all so attractive. Their credit card? Golly gee.

But if we rewind to this claim of being the leader in monetizing social traffic, we should expect to see some reviews of the company, right?

There are none. Not one review of this business, Page Fever. And it’s a bummer because the website is really, really well done. It looks like any other start-up with promise:

Page Fever's scam website

Reasons to distrust Pagefever.com

Bad English

After the inconsistent wording in the e-mail, I found another thing that worries me. The wording on the page is very good English. But when you take a look at the blog, it becomes iffy, to say the least. Case in point:

“Why are talking about the advantages of a business website over facebook page? In 2017, many of the business owners have chosen Facebook as their business media and sharing center. But you might wonder to hear that even the 4th largest website on the internet has got some limitations if you think about the growth of your business. I also agree that there are advantages as well. But, personally, I have researched out that having a business website is more worthy than a Facebook business page. Choosing only Facebook for your business marketing is a slow growth.”

I believe that whoever is behind this website hired the right people for developing the website and copywriting the landing pages. But I think they’re taking low bids for blog posts from contributors on content mills like Upwork or Freelancer. Honestly, there’s nothing wrong with poor-English blog posts, but in this case it just gives credence to my suspicions.

Deleted or unavailable pages

If you visit their website, you’ll see that the “Team” and “Clients” pages don’t exist. On the “About” page, they have three purported clients. I did try to contact these pages to ask if they know Page Fever, but I think that it is by design that Page Fever claims such famous clients. It makes it difficult to contact them.

I found a Reddit post where they discuss the trustworthiness of Page Fever. One comment mentioned that what they want to do is against Facebook’s ToS (Terms of Service). Even more intriguing was the comment who mentioned he was contacted by a one Daniel Normore. He found the guy’s photo on Page Fever (http://pagefever.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/daniel.normore-1.jpg). Then, he did a reverse image search on Google and found this link. Turns out the photo for “Daniel Normore” is actually a New Jersery psychology professional counselor.

I guess that’s why they deleted their “Team” page.

I dug a bit more and found my Wu Luong’s “profile“.

A video with no substance

Videos introducing a user to a service typically give us details. This video does nothing of the sort. The girl is cute, smiling, and the video is crisp. It has that legit quality, for its good visual and audio production. But it’s empty of substance, it gives no details. Likely, the girl was hired as a freelancer to create the video. Or it was a one-off project that some video company was paid to do. In any case, we’ll never know. The point is that it’s just one more prop on this elaborate stage of misdirection.

Scam and malware sites rank Page Fever low, or not at all

  • Facebook.com: There’s a long thread with others who have been contacted by Page Fever. Most revealing is this post, who claims he got the 200USD, but then Facebook caught on to the illegality of the practice and shut out his account:

Page fever 200 dollars scam

Several other posters explain that they did the deal, but were never paid, and only heard excuses from the other end. Perhaps Page Fever judges risks and does pay select ‘influencer’ targets something, to entice them. If we have hundreds of thousands of followers, it might be in their best interest to pay something low in order to keep using our pages for advertising–payout on their side from the businesses whose merch they’re pushing via our pages might be much larger.

Information on their location is sketchy

In Wu Luong’s e-mail, he or she gave me a phone number which uses a 929 area code. The address of the company is purported to be 115 E 23rd St, 3rd Flr, New York, New York. The 929 area code is in New York City, but the closest it gets to their address is Marble Hill. I didn’t try to contact it. Also, I know that you can reroute phone numbers to deliver the call to an unlisted, foreign number. This is called international call forwarding.

Then I went after the address. Businesses nowadays list their addresses, and it’s easy to verify. Sure enough, I discovered that the business at the purported address is a work co-op called the Bond Collective. 115 E 23rd St, 3rd Flr, New York, New York is their Flatiron location. I know the area well, I play The Division. heh

Bond Collective Flatiron
Hell, I’d hang out at the Bond Collective if I lived in NY!

I don’t know the rules on listing your business address as a co-op, and I’m not going to research that. I know there are a lot of freelancers who need an address, but I’m a freelancer and I use my home address.

So, does the Page Fever scammer pay to do his or her work from the Bond Collective? I doubt it. I don’t think someone who scams others is the co-working space type. Apart from that, I’ll give you another juicy piece.

Blocked WHOIS data

You can use WHOIS lookup to find out the owner of any website, their address, phone number, etc. I looked up pagefever.com, and this is what I got:

WHOIS guard for Pagefever

Pagefever uses Whoisguard, Inc. to block their information. So we’re not seeing Page Fever information here. What we see instead is a Panama address, a phone number with a Minnesota area code, and a fax number with a Peruvian country code. This doesn’t mean much, although typically WHOIS blockers should give consistent information on how to contact the blocking company.


No, what we’re interested in is the fact that they block their information in the first place. I am a private citizen with my personal website Things in Squares. I therefore block my information because it would be my personal address. However, companies do not block this information, because a legitimate company is anchored to the legitimate business address.

That’s just one more reason to suspect that Page Fever is a scam.


So anyway

This is a blog about making webcomics and everything that comes with it. Unfortunately, that means scams. I know that this post is overkill, but Page Fever attacks the little guy with their scam, and I say fuck that.

This is what you get for trying your scam on me.


 


*Affiliate links may appear on this page

75 thoughts on “PageFever.com tried to Scam me, so I’ll SEO the shit out of this post

  1. A huge “Thank You!!!” for taking the time to investigate and post this about Pagefever.com. I just got their solicitation this AM and was suspicious. Your post was on page one of Google, so you did a great SEO job. People like you do a great service and are greatly appreciated by those of us not so terribly tech savvy. Although I am not an illustrator, my site (me) basically creates humor by adding comments to photographs and videos.
    Anyway, your good intentions got me here, so I’m going to take a long look around. I do need help with SEO. – Again, a very sincere thanks. – Ted Bergman – dogsandcatsgohollywood.com

    1. Hey no problem Ted, you’re the first it seems to have benefited from it. And that’s precisely why I wrote it, to warn folks. So, it’s my pleasure!

      1. Thanks for this post. I think they changed their name from PageFever.com to Gram Celeb. I just got this email with very similar phrasing:

        “Hi

        My name is Joe and I’m the Accounts Manager at GramCeleb. Influencer
        Marketing is on the rise and thousands of Influencers are getting paid
        to: review products, write articles, sponsor posts, create videos,
        etc. We specialize in increasing Infuencer traffic and providing
        passive incomes, marketing our own health and beauty products on the
        Facebook platform.

        GramCeleb is the future of Influencer Marketing: receive weekly
        payments of $250 and increase your Facebook following, with minimal
        effort on your end.

        Here’s how it works:

        1.You let us use your Facebook Advertising Account to promote our
        client’s products. Your Page will never experience any risk. Facebook
        allows leeway to people who own very strong pages, and since our
        advertisements are “aggressive”, we need your help.

        2. We offer $200 as sign-up bonus and Complimentary Service of
        $50/week for Page Promotion. After the first week, you will receive
        weekly payments of $250 as long as your Advertising Account is active.

        3. Once you agree to allow us access to your Ads Manager, I will walk
        you through the onboarding process. It’s a quick process that will
        take only 5 minutes. I will elaborate on this part in the next email
        if you are interested.

        We pay you to simply allow us access to your Ads Manager and also
        provide $50 per week of free promotions on your page and posts. This
        is a mutually-beneficial partnership, especially if you are not using
        your Ads Manager Account.

        Your influence and consistent activity on your Facebook Page will help
        us keep our aggressive advertisements up for longer. Meanwhile, we
        will send out weekly payments with minimal amount of work on your end.
        Another win-win.

        There is absolutely no risk to your Brand or Facebook Page. Nothing
        will ever be exposed to your Brand, Facebook Page or Followers.

        If interested, please fill out this quick form at
        http://gramceleb.com/interest, and an onboarding specialist should
        contact you shortly. Thanks for your time!”

        1. Hi how do you know that Pagefever is the same as Gram celeb? They just emailed me today and yes it was really good but then i had to halt myself.

          1. I’m an ex employee at the company GramCeleb, PageFever are both the SAME company as OneShotMarketing LLC. GramCeleb, PageFever and OneShotMarketing are the same company using the same employees, same office space and PageFever and GramCeleb are literally 1 rooms next to each other lol 38-25 Bell Blvd Bayside 11361 2nd floor is OneShotMarketing LLC’s office and inside there will be Pagefever and GramCeleb because it is used to mask and protect OneShotMarketing LLC’s reputation they are not 3 different companies they are all one and the same.

          2. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS! They also emailed me with this guy called joe something from GRAMCELEB. The email was very suspicious and sounds too good to be true so I searched about them and found your blog. Saved me a lot of time researching for those shitbrains. Thank you again 🙂

        2. they changed it to page fever from gram celeb and now spotlight partnership.
          I partnered with Gramceleb .I got 500$ but my ad account got disabled.

  2. THANK YOU. Just got the email and wanted to do some digging since it immediately sounded shady to me. This saved me a ton of time!

  3. Thank you for this blogpost!! I was just contacted as well and like you I was intrigued, but saw red flags as they said I was very active on the page, I still use it, but I haven’t been very active in some time.. I looked it up, found this post and saved time and effort and possibly my Facebook page. Now I’m going to check out your comics x

  4. SO HAPPY YOU WROTE THIS POST! And kudos on the excellent SEO, by the way, it was right up there at the top when I googled “have you worked with Page fever”. It seemed super sketchy to me that they were offering me cash weekly to post ads from my page when they supposedly are “experts” in this whole social media thing.
    Anyway, I will make sure to write back and let them know that I have figured out they’re a scam.
    Thanks again!

    1. I got paid by them last week. The day after they emailed me. I was a bit a suspicious but when I received money so soon I took them to be legit even though I couldn’t find any other references for them.

      1. I also read about someone who got paid an initial sum. Please return here to comment further on your situation with them.

  5. Thanks for doing this, I almost forward to this “Daniel Normore” and say yes!, but then I doubt it and did a research and came to you, thanks so much!
    Fu***ng b**ch (Sorry!) but come on!! there’s a lot of newbies and bloggers, entrepreneurs, who try to do a lot of things to gain followers from 9 to 24 and some people try to play in your face, is not fair.
    But thanks to you we can skip this. Drag n drop into trash.

  6. Thanks so much for posting this. I actually came across your post while doing my own research after receiving the exact same email from Wu Luong. I’ve been getting hit up for a few years now via direct message on my fan page from so called marketers who want to buy my page, but now scammers have adapted and are obviously kicking up their game. Fake brand ID – well done asshats! I do feel bad for anyone who falls victim to them and I do hope that Facebook shuts them down. They have a legit FB biz page & I’ve reported them directly to FB for spam & I also blocked them.

  7. I am beyond pissed! I got paid but its not worth losing my ads account. To make matters worse my instagram business account is affected since its linked to FB. I notified PF and they have been giving me steps to reactivate but FB has final word. My account was closed to violating facebook guidelines. SMH

    1. Fuck that sucks. Thank you for coming back here to tell everyone. So now we know that they give initial payments, but then use black hat practices on your ads account. They probably made far more than they paid you, making it worth their time to blow up your account. Good luck to you Gabriel, I hope things work out.

      1. Hey Cale,

        I’m an ex-employee at this company and know the entire company inside out, would you like some assistance on full transparency on how the company operates? Let me know I’ll provide my email below and feel free to reach out we can skype chat or talk on the phone directly to make it easier.

        1. Hey mate. Just share with the community here. This thread helps improve peoples’ chances of avoiding getting scammed

  8. Thanks for doing research on this. I received an email today about my “active” art page and that was the red flag. I’ve been pretty inactive on FB since November. You were there second post listed on Google when searching “pagefever scam”.

  9. Just got an email from Dr. Daniel Normore! Found your post straight off the bat which confirmed my initial suspicions. Thanks for all the hard work on this. We live to fight another day!

  10. Thanks soooooo much for writing this article and doing such a great job with the SEO. I got the same letter and was very tempted. Decided to do some digging and your story popped up first thing. Can’t tell you how grateful I am. Thanks again!

  11. Again as an ex-employee I’d be glad to share any information, it’s pure black hat marketing and that’s why you can’t take PageFever down, the main company is actually One Shot Marketing LLC, because the CEO has reputation in the industry he keeps black hat marketing under lets just call them shell companies a.k.a PageFever and GramCeleb to prevent ruining his reputation as he attends and holds seminars. There’s MUCH more black hat along with ILLEGAL shit they’ve done and still do this is just a little tiny information.

  12. I was a client of OneShot Marketing (old name) and PageFever. I earned a lot of money with them, but it came at a cost. I am no longer able to boost any of my posts or access my Ads Manager. They used their own credit card and they never used my information or tampered with my page. However, I was always skeptical of their legitimacy and I only talked to one guy whenever we would have phone conversations. He sounded like a young Asian man. It can be a quick easy way to make a buck (or thousands), but you gotta be cautious.

    1. Yes that is correct for the most part the way it plays out is supposed to be like that, luckily you’re campaign ran for awhile enough for you to make good money, majority of people only get paid for a week-few weeks or they get instantly flagged and only receive the initial $200 (which many were purposely not paid and given excuses such as you were instantly flagged or didn’t do this step in time, etc they come up with anything to not pay if possible)

      Here’s a little more information that irked me on your post(You could’ve been paid off by the CEO himself as numerous youtube videos and bad review were all paid off, you can just search OneShotMarketing and know it’s obvious)

      Depending on how old of a client you are check this out, when you received your last steps with the company account and card by “John Riedsma” have you noticed that the “Company Credit Card” has your zip code? Ever wonder why you need to fill out the form stack? It’s for protection and to put the card under your information to try and not get instantly flagged just trying to avoid Facebook from catching on but nowhere does it say they will use your information for this purpose.

      1. Oh and let me not forget, if you’re Facebook page is connected to your Instagram or any other social media platform those will ALL be affected if your ads managers goes down as well. There have been occasions where the “company account” which in reality is just a bunch of regular people getting paid have messed around with clients pages making troll posts whether they were drunk, high or whatever it is is beyond me they’ve had clients Instagrams deleted along with Facebook pages itself, keep in mind if your ads managers is disabled you can not promote on Instagram either.

    2. You should check the initial card they gave you the zipcode is in your address put on the form stack when you signed up, if you’re from oneshotmarketing as well as pagefever (Now transitioning to Gram Celeb GramCeleb.com) you definitely were given a card with your information on it and was told it was their company card, as for bank statements provided to you by the company and other scum shit they’ve done is for another day. Cheers.

  13. Oh also, considering they’re hiding I might as well throw in Bayside Media as they are affiliated with OneShotMarketing/PageFever/GramCeleb they are all partners except PageFever and GramCeleb is literally OneShotMarketing LLC.

    38-25 Bell Blvd, Queens, 11361 is their actual office location by the way for anyone who wants to write mails or visit… it’s not in the city.

    1. Hey, I would like to talk to you about what else you know about this company, I think you would help me a lot with information

  14. Oh wow. GramCeleb emailed me.. I know it’s a scam. but i had to search what others say. Good job on SEOing the shit out of this. 😉

  15. I worked with them briefly. Every thing that GramCeleb says is accurate– I got the $200 to my PayPal and all. The problem is you canNOT use your credit card while they are using there’s so you can’t admin ads of other Pages linked to your account.

    Also, there is a risk that your account will be shut down because of the activity. I wouldn’t say they are a scam (I received everything they promised), but because it is under-the-table everything is very risky. If your page is disposable and you will never use FB Ads again, I would say go with it. If you plan on using FB Ads a lot in the future and building your page, you might want to hold off.

    1. Was there anything to stop you from disconnecting them from your page after the initial $200 payment?

    2. I agree with Todd and say it isn’t a scam. I signed up my PokemonGo page and I was partnered up for a good 6 months. I kept contact with their customer service reps and they actually helped me get my flagged account back. I received all my payments (although some were not on time) and made some really good money. I never used my ad account before so renting it to GramCeleb was no problem for me.

      If you don’t use your ad account there really is no loss. I allowed them access to some roles and earned money sitting on my butt xD

  16. Hey man thanks for this very detailed post on them. They are definitely now GramCeleb. They just contacted me & im in Sweden.

    1. GramCeleb.com is a scam, huh? Well, anyone searching for info will come here, thanks to your comment. They owe thanks to you, sir.

  17. They emailed me too today! I knew something was fishy so I googled it first and saw your post. Thank you!

  18. Thank you for your post! Crisis averted thanks to your well-researched information. GramCeleb seemed too good to be true, but the $$$ was tempting.

  19. They are not a scam. You will receive all they say you will receive in the contract. What you have to ask yourself is if losing your ads account is worth it, because you WILL lose your ads account. I was able to get 4 weeks of $250 per week payments and 4 weeks of $500 per weeks payments before my ads account was deactivated. If you have a legit business and rely on boosting your posts or creating ads to make money off your business, this will greatly affect you and I suggest you don’t do it. If you are tryna make a quick buck go ahead, and pray your account don’t get immediately flagged. Because if it does, all you will receive is that initial $200.

    Nothing shows up on your page, btw. And you also get a $50 allowance to create ads/boost posts.

  20. Just got the email from “Joey K.” with GramCeleb, asking if they could use the ads acct associated with my page facebook.com/NataliePalombiFitness … Responded to tell him I’m not risking MY integrity, as it’s clearly unethical to do this and it’s a Facebook Ads Manager TOS violation as well.
    I also added that if they aren’t doing anything illegal or unethical, why not just keep creating their own ads accounts?? Duh. Not today, Satan! Haha.

  21. Yup. I got an email from “Joe” via “GrabCeleb” today! Thank you for this post, getting the SEO nice and high so I found it right after I checked scamadviser.com for their legitimacy first.
    These types of scans will continue to exist so keep sharing information, friends!
    Here’s to happy and safe social media’ing!

  22. I got the same offer from “Gram Celeb” and like a fool I fell for it. Now I’m worried because I’m afraid somehow they will have a link to my own credit card through my Paypal account. I don’t know what to do. It occurred to me that it may be too good to be true but I asked around and was told people do pay to advertise on bigger FB pages. But I grew more suspicious when I asked fir their company phone number 3 times now through an email and they eluded the subject. What I don’t understand is how would this benefit their company? And what do I do now because I have signed the contract and they have my links. What coukd happen?

  23. Hi, if anyone has more information about these sites GRAMCELEB, PAGEFEVER that disappeared yesterday 29/06/17. Let him know Any information will be very helpful. regards

  24. Hola! No está de sobra los agradecimientos a esta gran investigación que has hecho. Definitivamente nos salvaste a muchos de ser estafados. Escribo el comentario en español para que sepan que estos estafadores llegaron hasta Monterrey, México. Igual me llego el correo del tal Joey K. Diciendo exactamente lo mismo que todo lo que comentan más arriba.
    Gracias nuevamente.

    1. igual soy de Nuevo Leon México y dicha oferta también me llego. según tengo entendido, la empresa ya termino su función, jajaj o tal vez me estafaron y me bloquearon de sus paginas. saludos de salinas victoria

    2. Probaste? Lo mismo me pasó a mi y no le entre con mis cuentas que tengo en orden. Estoy tentado en probar con una fb page que tengo, creando otro usuario de fb y poniéndolo como admin.

  25. I was skeptical and kept them at arms length at first, but the more payments I received the more confidence I got. It’s clear they are advertising products using methods that are aggressive and probably do not quite tie in with Facebook rules. YOu can clearly see what they are doing at every step so where this scare mongering nonsense comes from is beyond me. Only do it if you are no longer using page. I appealed having ads manager suspended twice and they reinstated, so payments continued. Your ads manager will eventually be closed, but if your not using it anymore do it! I received over a total of $1000.

  26. Great Post and very useful. I am thinking of using a diferente Ad Manager Account and Profile in order to protect my existing one and see what happens.

  27. I got paid, should have used a secondary ad account thought cause it was shut down within a few weeks. All the research did make it seem a bit sketchy, but this definitive thread didn’t pop up a few months ago. More than that I could never quite get a solid handle on exactly what and how they were advertising. After the ad account was shut down they gave me endless convoluted steps to change FB’s mind, in the end we agreed to just use a different admin ad acct. But then, TODAY, they we’re all like, no nevermind, we’re outta here. Anyway, money’s there, the questions are there too. Consider it, but with a secondary ad acct probably.

  28. Page Fever Real Website i am lot of payment Received 100% Good Site

    Tanks Page Fever

  29. You can call it a scam but once Facebook reactivated my ad account I made several thousand dollars through page fever. They abruptly ended my contract though. I can show PayPal screenshots but I’ll probably be accused of working for them

    1. The burden of proof is on them. Posting as anon and not giving evidence to your claims doesn’t help the thread trust this company any more.

  30. I know this comment is late, but it’s necessary. Sometimes things that seem to good do not equal scam. Page Fever was one of those.

    It’s not in service now, but I know I took them up and there offer and I earned right around $2000 in a month.

    That’s not to say jump on any and everything…But I will say that if you’re presented with an opportunity – that doesn’t cost you anything don’t automatically think it’s B.S.

    Be Peaceful,

    Roger

    1. It’s good to know it worked for some people. It didn’t for others, and for some it was detrimental to their Facebook ads account. Thanks for the comment

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